VOAS

VOAS

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

Private: For sovereign Americans only!

Hague Conventions A clever way to legitimize WAR.  WAR is an unlawful act against humanity.  It can never be justified!

More on the illusion of legitimacy – it is all fraud!  It is all fake.  It is all an act!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hague Conventions

 

Hague Conventions

 

****PUBLIC NOTICE*** SUSPECTED FAKE CALIFORNIA CORPORATE WEBSITES

Franchise Tax Board – Semantic Deceit – AKA – Califrnia Govt Operations Agcy

Summary – IRS Audit, Conspiring with California Franchise Tax Board

 

13Sep16 – Transparent California
12-24-18 *** MUFG -UNION BANK – IRS – OCC -CFPB – CFTB – THE DEEP STATE – CONSPIRE TO COMMIT FRAUD

 

Dr. Schroder’s Work – War Powers Act

1933-Plus

Senate Report 93-549 as related to 1933

1934-congressman-mcfaddens-comments-and-affidavit-calling-out-the-fed

 

 

 

 

 

Private: An extension – For sovereign Americans only!

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

letter-to-america

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

Security Access REMOVED!

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

YOU SEE A PROBLEM HERE? DISCRIMINATION? Billing Fraud?

 

YOU SEE THE FRAUDULENT BILLING SCAM HERE?

Executive Level Customer Service:

The meter is read on alternate month’s.  The CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION (CPUC) has authorized this.  This strategy permits Edison to estimate the usage for the month’s not read.  When the meter is read, it evens out the usage…Right?  Sure seems fair…right?

Well the reality is…the estimated months are estimated at very unrealistic levels.  OK…So what is the big deal?

WELL IN THE MONTHS WHERE THE METER IS READ, IT REPORTS EXCESSIVE USAGE AND THEN THE TIER SYSTEM PENALIZES THE USER.  THE PENALTY COMES IN THE FORM OF AN EEGERY USAGE INCENTIVE…ESSENTIALLY A EXTRA CHARGE – ITS JUST ANOTHER TAX WITHOUT REPRESENTATION TO ME.  WHAT ABOUT YOU?

THROWING A BUNCH OF TEA LEAVES INTO BOSTON HARBOR HAS NOTHING ON THESE GUYS…BUT OF COURSE OUR FAKE GOVERNMENTS HAVE SOLD THE PUBLIC UTILITIES TO INTERNATIONAL OWNERS WHO COULD GIVE A RAT’S ASS ABOUT  THE AMERICAN PEOPLE.

OH MY GOODNESS…DID I SAY THAT?

YOU BET YOUR SWEET BIPPY I DID!

Edison – Edison – Edison – New tool added to arsenal…

 

 

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

Americans—FREE AT LAST!

DOWNLOAD YOUR OWN COPY:
Free at last

“You Know Something Is Wrong When…..An American Affidavit of Probable Cause” | Scanned Retina – A Resource for the People!

Voila_Capture 2016-01-30_07-57-33_AM

Voila_Capture 2016-01-30_07-57-59_AM

Voila_Capture 2016-01-30_07-58-21_AM

 

 

Just publishing this notice and information would seem to be lacking providing additional suggestions on how to lawfully and orderly proceeding to implement the required changes.  Below are just some thoughts on how and where to begin.  Please add any comments you deem appropriate.

Judge Anna: Reply to suggestions

 

arnie

“You only think you know!”

Voila_Capture 2016-01-16_12-58-55_AM

The flag of the Continental united States of America

arnie@arnierosner.com
http://scannedretina.com
714-964-4056
714-501-8247 – mobile

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

11-13 A.M. EDT September 25, 2018 – Those who believe they are free — ARE!

11-13 A.M. EDT September 25, 2018 – Those who believe they are free — ARE!

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

What Makes Us Human?

https://www.thoughtco.com/what-makes-us-human-4150529

What Makes Us Human?

Drawings of evolution of humans from apes

 

Drawing of Hominid evolution through time. DEA/De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images

There are multiple theories about what makes us human—several that are related or interconnected. The topic of human existence has been pondered for thousands of years. Ancient Greek philosophers Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle all theorized about the nature of human existence as have countless philosophers since. With the discovery of fossils and scientific evidence, scientists have developed theories as well. While there may be no single conclusion, there is no doubt that humans are, indeed, unique. In fact, the very act of contemplating what makes us human is unique among animal species.

Most species that have existed on planet Earth are extinct, including a number of early human species. Evolutionary biology and scientific evidence tell us that all humans evolved from apelike ancestors more than 6 million years ago in Africa. Information obtained from early-human fossils and archaeological remains suggests that there were 15 to 20 different species of early humans several million years ago. These species, called hominins, migrated into Asia around 2 million years ago, then into Europe and the rest of the world much later. Although different branches of humans died out, the branch leading to the modern human, Homo sapiens, continued to evolve.

Humans have much in common with other mammals on Earth in terms of physiology but are most like two other living primate species in terms of genetics and morphology: the chimpanzee and bonobo, with whom we spent the most time on the phylogenetic tree. However, as much like the chimpanzee and bonobo as we are, the differences are vast.

Apart from our obvious intellectual capabilities that distinguish us as a species, humans have several unique physical, social, biological, and emotional traits. Although we can’t know precisely what is in the minds of other animals, scientists can make inferences through studies of animal behavior that inform our understanding.

Thomas Suddendorf, professor of psychology at the University of Queensland, Australia, and author of “The Gap: The Science of What Separates Us From Other Animals,” says that “by establishing the presence and absence of mental traits in various animals, we can create a better understanding of the evolution of mind. The distribution of a trait across related species can shed light on when and on what branch or branches of the family tree the trait is most likely to have evolved.”

As close as humans are to other primates, theories from different fields of study, including biology, psychology, and paleoanthropology, postulate that certain traits are uniquely human. It is particularly challenging to name all of the distinctly human traits or reach an absolute definition of “what makes us human” for a species as complex as ours.

 

The Larynx (Voice Box)

Dr. Philip Lieberman of Brown University explained on NPR’s “The Human Edge” that after humans diverged from an early-ape ancestor more than 100,000 years ago, the shape of the mouth and vocal tract changed, with the tongue and larynx, or voice box, moving further down the tract.

The tongue became more flexible and independent and was able to be controlled more precisely. The tongue is attached to the hyoid bone, which is not attached to any other bones in the body. Meanwhile, the human neck grew longer to accommodate the tongue and larynx, and the human mouth grew smaller.

The larynx is lower in the throats of humans than it is in chimpanzees, which, along with the increased flexibility of the mouth, tongue, and lips, is what enables humans to speak as well as to change pitch and sing. The ability to speak and develop language was an enormous advantage for humans. The disadvantage of this evolutionary development is that this flexibility comes with an increased risk of food going down the wrong tract and causing choking.

 

The Shoulder

Human shoulders have evolved in such a way that, according to David Green, an anthropologist at George Washington University, “the whole joint angles out horizontally from the neck, like a coat hanger.” This is in contrast to the ape shoulder, which is pointed more vertically. The ape shoulder is better suited for hanging from trees, whereas the human shoulder is better for throwing and hunting, giving humans invaluable survival skills. The human shoulder joint has a wide range of motion and is very mobile, affording the potential for great leverage and accuracy in throwing.

 

The Hand and Opposable Thumbs

Although other primates also have opposable thumbs, meaning they can be moved around to touch the other fingers, imparting the ability to grasp, the human thumb differs from that of other primates in terms of exact location and size. According to the Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny, humans have “a relatively longer and more distally placed thumb” and “larger thumb muscles.” The human hand has also evolved to be smaller and the fingers straighter. This has given us better fine motor skills and the ability to engage in detailed precision work such as writing with a pencil.

 

Naked, Hairless Skin

Although there are other mammals that are hairless—the whale, elephant, and rhinoceros, to name a few—humans are the only primates to have mostly naked skin. Humans evolved that way because changes in the climate 200,000 years ago that demanded that they travel long distances for food and water. Humans also have an abundance of sweat glands, called eccrine glands. To make these glands more efficient, human bodies had to lose their hair to better dissipate heat. This enabled them to obtain the food they needed to nourish their bodies and brains, while keeping them at the right temperature and allowing them to grow.

 

Standing Upright and Bipedalism

One of the most significant traits that make humans unique preceded and possibly led to the development of other notable characteristics: bipedalism—that is, using only two legs for walking. This trait emerged in humans millions of years ago, early in human evolutionary development and gave humans the advantage of being able to hold, carry, pick up, throw, touch, and see from a higher vantage point, with vision as the dominant sense. As human legs evolved to become longer about 1.6 million years ago and humans became more upright, they were able to travel great distances as well, expending relatively little energy in the process.

 

Blushing Response

In his book “The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals,” Charles Darwin said that “blushing is the most peculiar and the most human of all expressions.” It is part of the “fight or flight response” of the sympathetic nervous system that causes the capillaries in human cheeks to dilate involuntarily in response to feeling embarrassment. No other mammal has this trait, and psychologists theorize that it has social benefits as well. Given that it is involuntary, blushing is considered to be an authentic expression of emotion.

 

The Human Brain

The human feature that is most extraordinary is the brain. The relative size, scale, and capacity of the human brain are greater than those of any other species. The size of the human brain relative to the total weight of the average human is 1-to-50. Most other mammals have a ratio of only 1-to-180.

The human brain is three times the size of a gorilla brain. Although it is the same size as a chimpanzee brain at birth, the human brain grows more during the lifespan of a human to become three times the size of the chimpanzee brain. In particular, the prefrontal cortex grows to encompass 33 percent of the human brain compared to 17 percent of the chimpanzee brain. The adult human brain has about 86 billion neurons, of which the cerebral cortex comprises 16 billion. In comparison, the chimpanzee cerebral cortex has 6.2 billion neurons.

It is theorized that childhood is much longer for humans, with offspring remaining with their parents for a longer period of time because it takes longer for the larger, more complex human brain to fully develop. Studies suggest that the brain is not fully developed until the ages of 25 to 30.

 

The Mind: Imagination, Creativity, and Forethought

The human brain and the activity of its countless neurons and synaptic possibilities contribute to the human mind. The human mind is different from the brain: The brain is the tangible, visible part of the physical body whereas the mind consists of the intangible realm of thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and consciousness.

In his book “The Gap: The Science of What Separates Us From Other Animals,” Thomas Suddendorf suggests:

“Mind is a tricky concept. I think I know what a mind is because I have one—or because I am one. You might feel the same. But the minds of others are not directly observable. We assume that others have minds somewhat like ours—filled with beliefs and desires—but we can only infer those mental states. We cannot see, feel, or touch them. We largely rely on language to inform each other about what is on our minds.” (p. 39)

As far as we know, humans have the unique power of forethought: the ability to imagine the future in many possible iterations and then to actually create the future we imagine. Forethought also allows humans generative and creative abilities unlike those of any other species.

 

Religion and Awareness of Death

One of the things that forethought also gives humans is the awareness of mortality. Unitarian Universalist minister Forrest Church (1948-2009) explained his understanding of religion as “our human response to the dual reality of being alive and having to die. Knowing we are going to die not only places an acknowledged limit upon our lives, it also gives a special intensity and poignancy to the time we are given to live and love.”

Regardless of one’s religious beliefs and thoughts about what happens after death, the truth is that, unlike other species who live blissfully unaware of their impending demise, most humans are conscious of the fact that someday they will die. Although some species react when one of their own has died, it is unlikely that they actually think about death—that of others or their own.

The knowledge of mortality also spurs humans on to great achievements, to making the most out of the lives they have. Some social psychologists maintain that without the knowledge of death, the birth of civilization and the accomplishments it has spawned might never have occurred.

 

Storytelling Animals

Humans also have a unique type of memory, which Suddendorf calls “episodic memory.” He says, “Episodic memory is probably closest to what we typically mean when we use the word ‘remember’ rather than ‘know.'” Memory allows human beings to make sense of their existence and to prepare for the future, increasing their chances of survival, not only individually but also as a species.

Memories are passed on through human communication in the form of storytelling, which is also how knowledge is passed from generation to generation, allowing human culture to evolve. Because human beings are highly social animals, they strive to understand one another and to contribute their individual knowledge to a joint pool, which promotes more rapid cultural evolution. In this way, unlike other animals, each human generation is more culturally developed than preceding generations.

Drawing on research in neuroscience, psychology, and evolutionary biology, in his book, “The Storytelling Animal,” Jonathon Gottschall delves into what it means to be an animal that relies so uniquely on storytelling. He explains what makes stories so important: They help us to explore and simulate the future and test different outcomes without having to take real physical risks; they help to impart knowledge in a way that is personal and relatable to another person; and they encourage pro-social behavior, since “the urge to produce and consume moralistic stories is hard-wired into us.”

Suddendorf writes this about stories:

“Even our young offspring are driven to understand others’ minds, and we are compelled to pass on what we have learned to the next generation. As an infant starts on the journey of life, almost everything is a first. Young children have a ravenous appetite for the stories of their elders, and in play they reenact scenarios and repeat them until they have them down pat. Stories, whether real or fantastical, teach not only specific situations but also the general ways in which narrative works. How parents talk to their children about past and future events influences children’s memory and reasoning about the future: the more parents elaborate, the more their children do.”

Thanks to their unique memory and ability to acquire language skills and write, humans around the world, from the very young to the very old, have been communicating and transmitting their ideas through stories for thousands of years, and storytelling remains integral to being human and to human culture.

 

Biochemical Factors

Defining what makes humans human can be tricky as more is learned about the behavior of other animals and fossils are uncovered that revise the evolutionary timeline, but scientists have discovered certain biochemical markers that are specific to humans.

One factor that may account for human language acquisition and rapid cultural development is a gene mutation that only humans have on the FOXP2 gene, a gene we share with Neanderthals and chimpanzees, that is critical for the development of normal speech and language.

A study by Dr. Ajit Varki of the University of California, San Diego, found another mutation unique to humans in the polysaccharide covering of the human cell surface. Dr. Varki found that the addition of just one oxygen molecule in the polysaccharide that covers the cell surface differentiates humans from all other animals.

 

The Future of the Species

Humans are both unique and paradoxical. While they are the most advanced species intellectually, technologically, and emotionally—extending human lifespans, creating artificial intelligence, traveling to outer space, showing great acts of heroism, altruism and compassion—they also have the capacity to engage in primitive, violent, cruel, and self-destructive behavior.

 

Sources

• Arain, Mariam, et al. “Maturation of the Adolescent Brain.” Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, Dove Medical Press, 2013, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3621648/.

• “Brains.” The Smithsonian Institution’s Human Origins Program, 16 Jan. 2019, humanorigins.si.edu/human-characteristics/brains.

• Gottschall, Jonathan. The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human. Mariner Books, 2013.

• Gray, Richard. “Earth – The Real Reasons Why We Walk on Two Legs, and Not Four.” BBC, BBC, 12 Dec. 2016, http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20161209-the-real-reasons-why-we-walk-on-two-legs-and-not-four.

• “Introduction to Human Evolution.” The Smithsonian Institution’s Human Origins Program, 16 Jan. 2019, humanorigins.si.edu/education/introduction-human-evolution.

• Laberge, Maxine. “Chimps, Humans and Monkeys: What’s the Difference?” Jane Goodall’s Good for All News, 11 Sept. 2018, news.janegoodall.org/2018/06/27/chimps-humans-monkeys-whats-difference/.

• Masterson, Kathleen. “From Grunting to Gabbing: Why Humans Can Talk.” NPR, NPR, 11 Aug. 2010, http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129083762.

• “Mead Project Source Page, A.” Charles Darwin: The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals: Chapter 13, brocku.ca/MeadProject/Darwin/Darwin_1872_13.html.

• “Naked Truth, The.” Scientific American, https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-naked-truth/.

• Suddendorf, Thomas. “The Gap: The Science of What Separates Us from Other Animals.” Basic Books, 2013.

• “Thumb Opposability.” Thumb Opposability | Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA), carta.anthropogeny.org/moca/topics/thumb-opposability.

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

Valuable Intellectual Traits

https://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/valuable-intellectual-traits/528

Valuable Intellectual Traits


  • Intellectual Humility: Having a consciousness of the limits of one’s knowledge, including a sensitivity to circumstances in which one’s native egocentrism is likely to function self-deceptively; sensitivity to bias, prejudice and limitations of one’s viewpoint. Intellectual humility depends on recognizing that one should not claim more than one actually knows. It does not imply spinelessness or submissiveness. It implies the lack of intellectual pretentiousness, boastfulness, or conceit, combined with insight into the logical foundations, or lack of such foundations, of one’s beliefs.  
  • Intellectual Courage: Having a consciousness of the need to face and fairly address ideas, beliefs or viewpoints toward which we have strong negative emotions and to which we have not given a serious hearing. This courage is connected with the recognition that ideas considered dangerous or absurd are sometimes rationally justified (in whole or in part) and that conclusions and beliefs inculcated in us are sometimes false or misleading. To determine for ourselves which is which, we must not passively and uncritically “accept” what we have “learned.” Intellectual courage comes into play here, because inevitably we will come to see some truth in some ideas considered dangerous and absurd, and distortion or falsity in some ideas strongly held in our social group. We need courage to be true to our own thinking in such circumstances. The penalties for non-conformity can be severe.  
  • Intellectual Empathy: Having a consciousness of the need to imaginatively put oneself in the place of others in order to genuinely understand them, which requires the consciousness of our egocentric tendency to identify truth with our immediate perceptions of long-standing thought or belief. This trait correlates with the ability to reconstruct accurately the viewpoints and reasoning of others and to reason from premises, assumptions, and ideas other than our own. This trait also correlates with the willingness to remember occasions when we were wrong in the past despite an intense conviction that we were right, and with the ability to imagine our being similarly deceived in a case-at-hand.
  • Intellectual Autonomy: Having rational control of one’s beliefs, values, and inferences, The ideal of critical thinking is to learn to think for oneself, to gain command over one’s thought processes. It entails a commitment to analyzing and evaluating beliefs on the basis of reason and evidence, to question when it is rational to question, to believe when it is rational to believe, and to conform when it is rational to conform.
     
  • Intellectual Integrity: Recognition of the need to be true to one’s own thinking; to be consistent in the intellectual standards one applies; to hold one’s self to the same rigorous standards of evidence and proof to which one holds one’s antagonists; to practice what one advocates for others; and to honestly admit discrepancies and inconsistencies in one’s own thought and action.  
  • Intellectual Perseverance: Having a consciousness of the need to use intellectual insights and truths in spite of difficulties, obstacles, and frustrations; firm adherence to rational principles despite the irrational opposition of others; a sense of the need to struggle with confusion and unsettled questions over an extended period of time to achieve deeper understanding or insight.  
  • Confidence In Reason: Confidence that, in the long run, one’s own higher interests and those of humankind at large will be best served by giving the freest play to reason, by encouraging people to come to their own conclusions by developing their own rational faculties; faith that, with proper encouragement and cultivation, people can learn to think for themselves, to form rational viewpoints, draw reasonable conclusions, think coherently and logically, persuade each other by reason and become reasonable persons, despite the deep-seated obstacles in the native character of the human mind and in society as we know it.  
  • Fairmindedness: Having a consciousness of the need to treat all viewpoints alike, without reference to one’s own feelings or vested interests, or the feelings or vested interests of one’s friends, community or nation; implies adherence to intellectual standards without reference to one’s own advantage or the advantage of one’s group.

Valuable Intellectual Virtues (September 2014). Foundation For Critical Thinking, Online at website: www.criticalthinking.org)

Back to top

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

Characteristics of intellectually advanced young people

https://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10501

Characteristics of intellectually advanced young people

This brief list offers some common characteristics of highly intelligent young people. Please keep in mind that this list is not comprehensive in that each young person has individual traits and interests.

Profoundly gifted students think and learn differently than other students. Some common characteristics of profoundly gifted students can include one or more of the following:

  • An advanced ability to learn and process information rapidly.
  • An extreme need for constant mental stimulation.
  • A need to understand the world and for it to be logical and fair.
  • An ability to relate a broad range of ideas and synthesize commonalities among them.
  • An insatiable curiosity; endless questions, inquiries and appreciation for nuance.
  • An inborn sensitivity and awareness of life.
  • A need to explore some topics in greater depth.
  • A sense of frustration with regard to mundane or repetitious processes.

Profoundly gifted students may also:

  • Demonstrate different or unusual interests compared to their same age peers.
  • Reach developmental milestones earlier and faster.
  • Read early or understand math concepts at a very young age.
  • Hold themselves and others to high standards.
  • Exhibit asynchronous development, which can manifest as uneven intellectual, physical, and emotional development.

Oftentimes profoundly intelligent young people are not properly identified and, thus, do not receive an appropriately challenging education. Research shows this can lead to underachievement or even dropping out of school – studies indicate that 40 percent of all gifted students may be underachievers (Handbook of Gifted Education, p. 424). If you know a young person who may have advanced intellectual abilities, there is a wealth of information available at http://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database.

Some other articles are:

Permission Statement


The appearance of any information in the Davidson Institute’s Database does not imply an endorsement by, or any affiliation with, the Davidson Institute. All information presented is for informational purposes only and is solely the opinion of and the responsibility of the author. Although reasonable effort is made to present accurate information, the Davidson Institute makes no guarantees of any kind, including as to accuracy or completeness. Use of such information is at the sole risk of the reader.

Share by email

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

Examples of Personality Traits

https://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-personality-traits.html

 

Examples of Personality Traits

5th grade6th grade7th grade8th grade9th grade10th grade11th grade12th gradeMiddle SchoolHigh SchoolCollege

Before you can define who you are, you have to first understand some examples of personality traits. These can be determined by our actions, attitudes and behaviors. To help you discover your own personal traits ask yourself the following questions:

  • How would I describe myself?
  • What brought me joy as a child?
  • What brings me joy now?
  • What’s my biggest accomplishment?
  • What’s my biggest dream?
  • What’s my biggest fear?

By popping open your journal and recording the answers to these questions, you can use the information to discover your true personality. Let’s dive a little bit deeper.

Examples of Positive Personality Traits

Some, if not most, of your personality traits are likely to be positive. For example:

  • Being honest and taking responsibility for your actions are admirable qualities.
  • Adaptability and compatibility are great traits that can help you get along with others.
  • Drive and determination will help you keep going no matter what.
  • Compassion and understanding mean you relate well to others.
  • Patience is a virtue and also a good personality trait.
  • Courage will help you do what’s right in tough situations.
  • Loyalty is a good quality to possess, making others trust you.

Here is a list of positive adjectives that can help you describe personality traits:

Adventurous Helpful
Affable Humble
Capable Imaginative
Charming Impartial
Confident Independent
Conscientious Keen
Cultured Meticulous
Dependable Observant
Discreet Optimistic
Dutiful Persistent
Encouraging Precise
Exuberant Reliable
Fair Sociable
Fearless Trusting
Gregarious Valiant

Examples of Negative Personality Traits

What would life be without balance? Whether we like to admit it or not, some of our personality traits are also likely to be negative:

  • A propensity for lying, in order to avoid responsibility for our actions, is a deplorable quality.
  • Being rigid and selfish, unyielding to the needs of others are not endearing qualities.
  • Being full of laziness and excuses is sure to drive others away, too.
  • An inability to empathize with others will also alienate us from others.
  • Being quick to anger will turn people away.
  • Being disloyal, quick to talk about others behind their backs or, worse, stab them in the back for personal gain also falls high on the scale of negative personality traits.

Here is a list of negative adjectives that may describe aspects of personalities from time to time:

Arrogant Quarrelsome
Boorish Rude
Bossy Sarcastic
Conceited Self-centered
Cowardly Slovenly
Dishonest Sneaky
Finicky Stingy
Impulsive Sullen
Lazy Surly
Malicious Thoughtless
Obnoxious Unfriendly
Picky Unruly
Pompous Vulgar

Determining Personality Types

There are many different personality types. According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, there are sixteen different types. It’s unlikely that a person would fit into a single mold, but it is interesting to see which “mold” we tend toward.

Your personality type can be determined by many factors. One way to discover your personality type is to approach it scientifically. Test yourself online or ask a psychologist or therapist to analyze you.

In psychology, there are five factors that determine different personality traits. The big five factors are:

  1. Openness: appreciation for a variety of experiences.
  2. Conscientiousness: planning ahead rather than being spontaneous.
  3. Extraversion: being sociable, energetic and talkative.
  4. Agreeableness: being kind, sympathetic and happy to help.
  5. Neuroticism: inclined to worry or be vulnerable or temperamental.

Your personality test will assess how much of each of the big five factors you possess. This will help you gain more insight into your internal experience so you can make sense of your own thoughts and behaviors.

How Do I Create My Personality?

Your personality is set by no one but you. It encompasses the actions you take and the decisions you make. Either you are a patient person or not, a responsible person or not. Try asking yourself some searching questions to discover just what kind of person you are, such as: “if you found an animal hurt and alone, what would you do?” or “if you won the lottery how would you spend your time and money?”.

You may not be able to change your personality type, but you can change aspects of your personality by taking determined, active steps to become a more balanced person. Taking up a hobby is a great way to become a well-rounded individual. Sports can help you learn teamwork, arts and crafts can make you more patient, volunteering can help you become more caring. Even just reading a book can expand your horizons and push you to be better.

How Can My Personality Affect Others?

Being positive and upbeat can influence everyone around you, and so can negativity. For example, a friendly smile to a stranger can brighten up their day, just as a glare can cause their mood to drop. Bear in mind the famous Bible quote from Jesus of Nazareth, “Do unto others as you would have them do to you”.

While you may not be able to help it if you are having a bad day, or if you don’t like doing a particular task, changing your attitude changes everything. Complaining and sulking will only make time drag when doing an unpleasant job. Instead, try to shift your thoughts and redirect your mind. Being a more pleasant person helps everyone.

Be All You Can Be

Understanding these examples of personality traits is a great way to start your journey toward self-discovery. Make a concerted effort to fill up that journal with evocative questions and answers. Make the investment and mold yourself into the best possible version of yourself. If you’re up for the challenge, you can make positive changes to your personality.

And, if it’s your goal to become an award-winning short story writer, your characters will be all the more complex, based on your deep understanding of yourself and others.

positive and negative personality traits

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

Examples of Personality Traits

https://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-personality-traits.html

Examples of Personality Traits

5th grade6th grade7th grade8th grade9th grade10th grade11th grade12th gradeMiddle SchoolHigh SchoolCollege

Before you can define who you are, you have to first understand some examples of personality traits. These can be determined by our actions, attitudes and behaviors. To help you discover your own personal traits ask yourself the following questions:

  • How would I describe myself?
  • What brought me joy as a child?
  • What brings me joy now?
  • What’s my biggest accomplishment?
  • What’s my biggest dream?
  • What’s my biggest fear?

By popping open your journal and recording the answers to these questions, you can use the information to discover your true personality. Let’s dive a little bit deeper.

Examples of Positive Personality Traits

Some, if not most, of your personality traits are likely to be positive. For example:

  • Being honest and taking responsibility for your actions are admirable qualities.
  • Adaptability and compatibility are great traits that can help you get along with others.
  • Drive and determination will help you keep going no matter what.
  • Compassion and understanding mean you relate well to others.
  • Patience is a virtue and also a good personality trait.
  • Courage will help you do what’s right in tough situations.
  • Loyalty is a good quality to possess, making others trust you.

Here is a list of positive adjectives that can help you describe personality traits:

Adventurous Helpful
Affable Humble
Capable Imaginative
Charming Impartial
Confident Independent
Conscientious Keen
Cultured Meticulous
Dependable Observant
Discreet Optimistic
Dutiful Persistent
Encouraging Precise
Exuberant Reliable
Fair Sociable
Fearless Trusting
Gregarious Valiant

Examples of Negative Personality Traits

What would life be without balance? Whether we like to admit it or not, some of our personality traits are also likely to be negative:

  • A propensity for lying, in order to avoid responsibility for our actions, is a deplorable quality.
  • Being rigid and selfish, unyielding to the needs of others are not endearing qualities.
  • Being full of laziness and excuses is sure to drive others away, too.
  • An inability to empathize with others will also alienate us from others.
  • Being quick to anger will turn people away.
  • Being disloyal, quick to talk about others behind their backs or, worse, stab them in the back for personal gain also falls high on the scale of negative personality traits.

Here is a list of negative adjectives that may describe aspects of personalities from time to time:

Arrogant Quarrelsome
Boorish Rude
Bossy Sarcastic
Conceited Self-centered
Cowardly Slovenly
Dishonest Sneaky
Finicky Stingy
Impulsive Sullen
Lazy Surly
Malicious Thoughtless
Obnoxious Unfriendly
Picky Unruly
Pompous Vulgar

Determining Personality Types

There are many different personality types. According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, there are sixteen different types. It’s unlikely that a person would fit into a single mold, but it is interesting to see which “mold” we tend toward.

Your personality type can be determined by many factors. One way to discover your personality type is to approach it scientifically. Test yourself online or ask a psychologist or therapist to analyze you.

In psychology, there are five factors that determine different personality traits. The big five factors are:

  1. Openness: appreciation for a variety of experiences.
  2. Conscientiousness: planning ahead rather than being spontaneous.
  3. Extraversion: being sociable, energetic and talkative.
  4. Agreeableness: being kind, sympathetic and happy to help.
  5. Neuroticism: inclined to worry or be vulnerable or temperamental.

Your personality test will assess how much of each of the big five factors you possess. This will help you gain more insight into your internal experience so you can make sense of your own thoughts and behaviors.

How Do I Create My Personality?

Your personality is set by no one but you. It encompasses the actions you take and the decisions you make. Either you are a patient person or not, a responsible person or not. Try asking yourself some searching questions to discover just what kind of person you are, such as: “if you found an animal hurt and alone, what would you do?” or “if you won the lottery how would you spend your time and money?”.

You may not be able to change your personality type, but you can change aspects of your personality by taking determined, active steps to become a more balanced person. Taking up a hobby is a great way to become a well-rounded individual. Sports can help you learn teamwork, arts and crafts can make you more patient, volunteering can help you become more caring. Even just reading a book can expand your horizons and push you to be better.

How Can My Personality Affect Others?

Being positive and upbeat can influence everyone around you, and so can negativity. For example, a friendly smile to a stranger can brighten up their day, just as a glare can cause their mood to drop. Bear in mind the famous Bible quote from Jesus of Nazareth, “Do unto others as you would have them do to you”.

While you may not be able to help it if you are having a bad day, or if you don’t like doing a particular task, changing your attitude changes everything. Complaining and sulking will only make time drag when doing an unpleasant job. Instead, try to shift your thoughts and redirect your mind. Being a more pleasant person helps everyone.

Be All You Can Be

Understanding these examples of personality traits is a great way to start your journey toward self-discovery. Make a concerted effort to fill up that journal with evocative questions and answers. Make the investment and mold yourself into the best possible version of yourself. If you’re up for the challenge, you can make positive changes to your personality.

And, if it’s your goal to become an award-winning short story writer, your characters will be all the more complex, based on your deep understanding of yourself and others.

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment

THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY – COMMISSION OF FRAUD?

THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY – COMMISSION OF FRAUD?

Posted in Civil Rights Violations | Leave a comment