Live People seal documents with an autograph; Corporations use signatures

Live People seal documents with autograph; Corporations use signatures

 

On Sun, Oct 12, 2014 at 8:57 PM, Anna von Reitz <avannavon@gmail.com> wrote:
Strictly speaking, they aren’t allowed to address you—- you are a foreign state operating in a foreign jurisdiction, utterly immune and separate from them.  If they speak to you they also have a hard time keeping up the pretension that you are “dead”.

The proper way to close all correspondence is with the word “Sincerely”  and with your sealed autograph.

Voila_Capture 2014-10-12_06-02-39_PM

Living people have autographs, not signatures.  Signatures are made by corporate officers when they are acting in corporate office.

So you would autograph your full given “official” name first middle last and add the following disclaimer:  “non-negotiable autograph, all rights reserved”.

To be completely proper, you would write this is RED ink (red is for blood and land jurisdiction, blue is for water and maritime jurisdictions—which they have been using exclusively)
and you would seal the document near your autograph with your right thumbprint also in red ink.

Last but not least, you would affix a small stamp-sized color copy of your family crest at the bottom right hand corner of the last page of the document.

This completely seals a document—- the thumbprint stands for you the individual, the crest for your family name.

I am glad you are doing this, Nancy.  If enough other Americans do the same, it will help bring pressure to bear on him and his Office and upon the current regime. Simply knowing that there are lots of people “out here” who know the truth will speed the needed reforms.

About arnierosner

As an American I advocate a republic form of government, self-reliance, and adherence to the basic philosophy of the founding fathers and the founding documents, I ONLY respect those who respect and "HONOR" their honor. No exceptions!
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